The Not-So-Harmless Simple Interview Question

Via Psychology Today …

Many interviews open with what I like to call “inkblot test” questions. Inkblot questions are those open, seemingly harmless questions which interviewers use as icebreakers to learn more about what’s important to someone.  I call them “inkblot” questions because, like the traditional Rorschach test, they ask candidates to express an opinion about a seemingly neutral item. As innocent as they seem, however, a poor or strange response from a candidate can end their chance of getting the job.

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9 things that seal the deal for hiring managers

Via CNN / Careerbuilder …

One thing about the hiring process is true: It leaves much room for speculation. Whether you got the job — or you didn’t — most job seekers want to know why. Why were you chosen over the next guy? Or, better yet, why weren’t you? Was it your experience, your attitude, your interview answers, your outfit?

We decided to ask hiring managers directly: What seals the deal when you choose to hire a candidate? Why do you choose one person over another Their answers will give you some insight as to what you should pay attention to the next time you’re up for a job.

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10 Resume Red Flags

Via Yahoo! Finance …

Searching for a job is not always easy, no matter what state the economy is in. And when you’re on the hunt, your best weapon is your resume. This document must emphasize the best of your experience, education and skills and sell you to your future employer. It’s a lot to ask, but it is possible to get your CV into fighting shape. Don’t let your effort go to waste by having these glaring red flags on your resume.

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Craft a scannable résumé

Via philly.com …

For thirty years as an employment counselor I spent a lot of time getting jobseekers to write résumés that would capture the attention of a human reader. Occasionally, companies would assign initial résumé screening to trainee fresh out of college. I taught 1970s jobseekers to write catchy résumés with impressive bullet points and bold print. The challenge I gave my charges: “Your job is to write a résumé that gets through to Bill, my mythical screener, in 15 seconds.”

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The Growing Talent Crisis: Challenges and Solutions

Via CareerBuilder.com …

Employers throughout the world are increasingly struggling to keep pace with expanding hiring needs. A recent workforce planning study conducted by Aon Consulting for one of its clients showed that nearly 60 percent of its key knowledge workers and leaders would need to be replaced in the next five years.

But, demand for talented employees exceeds the supply, leaving many organizations wondering what strategies to adopt to retain and expand the workforce to maintain competitive advantage. Systematic workforce planning linked to key strategies and business challenges is a foundation for informed talent strategies and processes that will impact the bottom line favorably.

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Where, Oh Where, Has My Application Gone?

Via New York Times …

GETTING a rejection letter is a painful part of job hunting, but at least it means you’ve been noticed. These days, I’ve been hearing about more job hunters who respond to online job postings, only to hear nothing back from the company. Ever.

Was the position filled? Is the company just taking a long time to fill it? Did the hiring manager even see the application? You may never know.

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ATS: A KEY BUSINESS SOLUTION IN ANY ECONOMY

Today’s job market has created a conundrum for growing companies. The landscape is rich with qualified candidates. But issue a want ad, and some statistics note that 200 applications are likely to respond.

How can any employer reasonably cope with that flood of candidates?

Those corporations, healthcare organizations and government departments using an applicant tracking system find they have a powerful, enterprise-wide job acquisition and talent management solution ideal for businesses in hiring mode – or even those that are fully staffed.

Today’s ATS provides web-based applicant tracking and candidate management systems that empower businesses with easy-to-acquire and easy-to-use tools to reduce costs and streamline business operations. They automate candidate application and resume management – and create an invaluable competitive advantage.

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Don’t Make Candidates Jump Through Hoops

Via CollegeRecruiter.com …

There’s been an interesting discussion in the NACE JobPlace discussion list about the perception by many employers that students who do a more effective job of searching for employment opportunities will have a better chance of being hired.

I agree but caution those who believe that the best candidates are those who try the hardest to be hired.

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Staffing.org Report: Internet Best Practices

Human resources research and information site Staffing.org has published an excellent report titled, “Internet Best Practices,” which details how candidates are finding and applying to job opportunities.

It is packed with interesting stats that most recruiters will find useful and informative, for example, “While the Internet is it not yet a universal tool, it approaches that in certain demographic groups. And as it continues to mature, usage patterns are continually changing. Three years ago, major job boards were all the rage. Then niche job boards started gaining ground. Now it’s all about Twitter, Facebook and social media.”

Here is a link to the report: http://staffing.org/library_ViewArticle.asp?ArticleID=450

Google recruiter: Company kept ‘do not touch’ in hiring list

Via MercuryNews.com …

A recruiter who left Google last year says that the company had maintained a “do not touch” list of companies including Genentech and Yahoo, whose employees were not to be wooed to the Internet search giant.

That revelation could be significant in light of this week’s disclosure that the U.S. Justice Department is investigating whether Google, Yahoo, Apple, Genentech and other tech companies conspired to keep others from stealing their top talent.

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